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Periodic Representation

Four unusual and innovative ways to visualize the periodic table of elements, via handeyesuply.

  1. 3D model of Mendeleev’s periodic table
  2. Spiral periodic chart designed by Dr. Theodor Benfrey
  3. Oval rainbox table of the elements
  4. Serpentine chart of the elements and their periodic relationships, by J. F. Hyde, 1975

Hand-Eye Supply, based in Portland OR, have a cool blog and a great online store.

Image source: handeyesupply

5 notes

Harvard Graduate School of Education

Graphics from a master plan proposal and interview (with Payette) for reconceptualizing the HGSE campus in Cambridge.

1. Existing conditions plan: Appian Way as a campus bisector

2. Map of the HGSE campus showing fragmentation and dispersion of research components, with walking times.

3. Proposal to pedestrianize Appian Way into “Appian Walk” (probably anathema to Cantabrigians!)

4. Appian Walk as primary organizer for HGSE campus

5. Cross-axial connection to a proposed new building on Church Street, in the heart of Harvard Square

6. Definition of a central quad to give full definition to the concept of a HGSE campus

7. Existing conditions photograph of Appian Way

8. Quick-and-dirty sketch rendering of the pedestrianized Appian Walk

all graphics by markcareaga, September 2010

OfficeUS

OfficeUS, a joint project by Storefront for Art and Architecture and the journal PRAXIS, will represent the United States at the 14th International Architecture Exhibition, directed by Rem Koolhaas for la Biennale di Venezia, June 7 through November 23, 2014.

Payette, the firm I work for, will be among the firms included in the OfficeUS exhibit for the work we did at Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan.

OfficeUS

OfficeUS, a joint project by Storefront for Art and Architecture and the journal PRAXIS, will represent the United States at the 14th International Architecture Exhibition, directed by Rem Koolhaas for la Biennale di Venezia, June 7 through November 23, 2014.

Payette, the firm I work for, will be among the firms included in the OfficeUS exhibit for the work we did at Aga Khan University in Karachi, Pakistan.

Henry Ford Hospital  Detroit 1959
Albert Kahn Associates
Stumbled across this in Simon Henley’s The Architecture of Parking, published in 2007 by Thames & Hudson. This could be the best parking structure I’ve ever seen, and a case study in how to do precast concrete.

Henry Ford Hospital  Detroit 1959

Albert Kahn Associates

Stumbled across this in Simon Henley’s The Architecture of Parking, published in 2007 by Thames & Hudson. This could be the best parking structure I’ve ever seen, and a case study in how to do precast concrete.

4 notes

Profiles in Planning: Formal Structure in Non-Western Contexts

Images from a September 2013 blog post at payette.com for an award-winning project that I have been involved with since 2003.

Excerpt:

When Payette embarked on a master plan for the Aga Khan University Faculty of Arts and Sciences in 2003, it was a unique opportunity to plan and design a new campus from scratch in the ex-urban desert outside Karachi, Pakistan. The scale of the project was daunting: 560 acres (by way of comparison, New York’s Central Park is 778 acres); about two million square feet in the first phase for 1,600 students; planned growth up to 12,000 students. The first thing we needed was an organizing principle.

Image credits: 1. Payette, 2-3. Mark Careaga, Payette, 4. Bruce Macdonald, 5. Google Maps, 6. Mark Careaga, Payette and Google Maps, 7. Brian Carlic, Payette, 8. Mark Careaga, Payette

4 notes

KERF

This Seattle-based shop makes custom cabinetry, furniture, and millwork, all from Baltic birch plywood with exposed edge laminations, maple and walnut veneer faces, and judicious use of plastic laminate. Charles and Ray Eames would surely approve.

The joinery is simple and elegant, and the use of finger hold cutouts in lieu of hardware pulls is very smart and true to their commitment to the expressive potential of plywood. They opt for Blum Tandem undermount slides on drawers and Blum hinges on doors, showing a commitment to quality in the unseen (but certainly felt) aspects as well.

all photos from kerf

3 notes

Yiannis Krikis

Places Out of Order series, 2013

Yiannis Krikis, of Thessaloniki, is an extremely talented photographer with a prolific presence on Tumblr. This particular series stands out for its irony, wit, and a tinge of sadness, especially considering the economic backdrop in Greece. But he brings a touch of playful humor as well: some of these photos read like snapshots from a dystopian holiday with abandoned artifacts standing in for friends or family, who sometimes pose for the camera or are captured as candids. The discipline and rigor of the format and composition makes each image strong in its own right; taken together, they form a very compelling series.

photos by Yiannis Krikis

source

320 notes

Viewing Pavilion on Hill

architect: Trace Architecture Office Beijing (2012)

architecture as viewing apparatus:

The pavilion is located in woods on the hill of TashanPark in Weihai, a coastline city in Shandong. To protect the trees in site and offer the view to major sights of city, the building is conceived as a merged volume with three viewing tubes like tree branches orientating to different axis. Half buried and half cantilevered, the building provides to the visitor different experience on two levels: walking down half level, one will enter the inside of teahouse and gallery space with framed views to various scenery; walking up through the preserved trees in landscape to the roof terrace, one will enjoy a unfolded breathtaking panoramic view to the ocean on this viewing platform.

photographer: Yao Li

image source

5 notes

Aga Khan Award for Architecture – IX

Ninth in a series to showcase the 2013 cycle of shortlisted projects from what is arguably the most rigorous and thoughtful architectural award program in the world, encompassing design excellence, historic preservation and rehabilitation, and socioeconomic dimensions; focused on results, eschewing the cult of the hero-architect.

Museum of Handcraft Paper  Gaoligong, Yunnan Province, China (2010)

Architect: Trace Architecture Office, Beijing

Description (from the AKAA):

The Museum is located close to a village at the foot of Gaoligong Mountain, in the province of Yunnan, an area of significant Muslim presence. It provides exhibition space for ancient paper craft and artefacts produced locally. Six galleries clustered around a courtyard form a micro-village. The exhibition is extended through displays of paper-craft in the village. Texture is articulated through local materials, formal expression and visual connection with the landscape. The spatial experience of the village is consolidated within the museum. Interior spaces alternate between galleries and views beyond. Accommodation on upper levels includes offices, tea and guest rooms. Local timber, bamboo, handcrafted paper, low energy-consuming and decomposable natural materials are used.

Image credits: all images copyright Aga Khan Award for Architecture; photos 1 and 2 by Shu He; axonometric courtesy of the architect

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